Tuesday, August 23, 2011

A few highlights from an Amazing year...(last half)


Origanum acutidens, with its cool lime green bracts, makes a stark contrast to the cobalt blue of Delphinium pylzowii, a wonderful miniature delphinium...both self sow a bit and live forever: classic rock garden gems! (Did I mention they bloom all summer?)






Where has this been all my life? We have a splendid colony of Ornithogalum magnum in Birds and Bees Garden at DBG, and Bob Nold had an almost equally lovely one...It seems to like a bit of shade, and is simply huge! What a great cut flower it would make...






No, I do not know the name of the white peony, but the red is none other than the double form of fernleaf peony...These are amazing clumps throughout the growng season, I especially like them in bud...




Whoever thought Papaver alboroseum would be so stunning growing out on ordinary loam in full sun? Haven't checked lately to see if it is still alive...










I think every shade they come in is my favorite. Still waiting to get the truly Vermilion 'Beauty of Livermere' but this pink one is not too shoddy...





Of the dozen or so pediocacti that I grow, the loveliest is the little snowball that grows just at the west end of the Metro area... or grew may be more accurate.



Penstemon eatonii in the Children's Garden. looking just like it would in Canyon country...




Pokeweed may be a horrible pest in the East but we love it out here, especially in this ghostly form.






Outlandish I know. Wish I had even more dwarf Platycodon grandiflorus...




Primula veris loves us, and self sows. Toughest primrose...






Mystery nodding gray pasqueflower...any ideas of its name?








Another nodding pasqueflower: believe this came as P. campanella








A stunning evergreen Pyrrhosia from Mongolia






Saxifraga x apiculata 'Alba' in a trough....




Sempervivum octopodes, with jade green flowers...




Biennial, I know, But I can never do without Symphyandra wanneri...






Tulipa albertii in springtime (amazing color!)





The typical pink form of Tulipa humilis: probably my favorite (self sows a lot and blooms two or three years...)



Yuccca rostrata was over the top. Unbelievable this year! They were everywhere at the gardens...(Dan Johnson knows no shame)...

2 comments:

  1. Pokeweed! Ugh, yes it is a bane here in the northeast. Don't the birds spread those berries everywhere for you? Now that tulipa humilis - I could easily stand a big patch of it...

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  2. Pokeweed isn't a problem for us: probably because so much of the seed lands on spots too hot or dry to grow well. I have noticed a few self sown seedlings in the woods near our big, established plants (just enough to share!)...

    This is an example of how geographical the "weed" thing is: Kudzu is hard to establish here and not a problem, believe me!

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