Climbing Mount Southey, New Zealand

Mt. Southey with Acrothamnus (Leucopogon) colensoi in front
On November 2, barely a day or two after arriving in New Zealand, our redoubtable host Hamish Brown (click on his name to get a glimpse of his garden) wafted us up to a not terribly well known mountain (the better known peaks to the south where we were SUPPOSED to go were socked in with rain)...the scenery all the way northward was enchanting--the Canterbury plains and the foothills at the base of Mt. Southey* are somewhat drier than much of New Zealand--certainly to the north and west: they are borderline steppe and the higher you get the more pristine the countryside. The climb wasn't just memorable--it was one of the most magnificent days we shall ever pass--and it deserves the 100 or so images I have posted: I thank Hamish for any correct identifications--any errors are my own! You will find little or no commentary below: I think the mountain speaks pretty well for itself. I'm grateful my camera was working (smoking!) and the weather so perfect that day. So here you are!

Acrothamnus (Leucopogon) colensoi

Acrothamnus (Leucopogon)  colensoi

Acrothamnus (Leucopogon)  colensoi


Helichrysum intermedium


Another view of the mountain: we will be climbing the mountain up just left of the valley...

Celmisia sessiliflora
Hamish was suprised to see this so low.

Anistome aromatica
I love umbels!

Cytisus scoparius dwarfed by altitude
Hamish found a weed! Not many at this elevation...

Celmisia spectabilis

Celmisia discolor (top) bottom C. spectabilis

Aciphylla aurea

Dracophyllum spp.

Dracophyllums and grass making a fairy ring



Double fairy rings (grass and Dracophyllum)

Lower slope with various textures (and Dracophyllum)

Lycopodium fastigiatum

Lycopodium fastigiatum (left) Kelleria duefenbachii. and Gentiana corymbosa rosette far right.

Hebe pauciramosa

Hebe pauciramosa

Scleranthus uniflorus (or possibly a moss--can't tell without touching it, says Hamish)

Fairy ring and vista

Scleranthus uniflorus (top)

Mottled ground


Hebe lycopodioides

Hebe lycopodioides

Hebe odora

Celmisia discolor

Celmisia spectabilis

Celmisia semicordata

Olearia  sp

Olearia sp.

Dracophyllum & Usnea torulosa

Astelia nervosa

Mosses (most likely Racomitrium lanuginosum)

Mixed Celmisia, Dracophyllum, Acrothamnus and Racomitrium lanuginosum

Fairy ring Chionochloa australis

Hebe lycopodioides and Racomitrium lanuginosum

Racomitrium lanuginosum


Usnea

Racomitrium lanuginosum

Ranunculus insignis

Podocarpus nivalis

Helichrysum intermedium

Raoulia bryoides

Raoulia bryoides

Raoulia bryoides

Raoulia bryoides

Hebe epacridea
Hebe epacridea
Myosotis traversii

Leptinella atrata

Raoulia bryoides

Raoulia bryoides

Helichrysum intermedium


Raoulia bryoides

Raoulia bryoides

Raoulia bryoides

Helichrysum intermedium

Raoulia bryoides

Raoulia bryoides

Raoulia bryoides

Raoulia bryoides

Raoulia bryoides

Usnea gone crazy

Colobanthus acicularis

Ranunculus insignis

Ranunculus insignis

Colobanthus acicularis on Raoulia bryoides

Haastia pulvinaris
The vegetable sheep visible on the other side of the valley--quite a ways away!

Haastia pulvinaris

Haastia pulvinaris

Haastia pulvinaris

Haastia pulvinaris

Hamishus Brownii

Helichrysum intermedium

Raoulia mammilaris

Haastia sinclairii

Haastia pulvinaris

Haastia pulvinaris

Haastia pulvinaris

Haastia pulvinaris

Raoulia mammilaris

Raoulia mammilaris

Haastia pulvinaris

Haastia pulvinaris

Haastia sinclairii

Raoulia mammilaris (foreground)
Haastia pulvinaris (behind)

Haastia pulvinaris

Haastia pulvinaris

Haastia pulvinaris and reddish Epilobium sp,

Anistome imbricata var. imbricata


Raoulia mammilaris and Hamish

Raoulia mammilaris and Helichrysum intermedium


Medley of Haastia pulvinaris, Raoulia mammilaris and Phyllachne colensoi.


Raoulia mammilaris

Raoulia mammilaris


Raoulia mammilaris

Raoulia mammilaris

Raoulia mammilaris

Raoulia mammilaris

Celmisia viscosa

Celmisia viscosa

Haastia pulvinaris and Raoulia mammilaris

Raoulia mammilaris and chartreuse Haastia pulvinari

Raoulia mammilaris

Raoulia mammilaris, Haastia pulvinaris and me...

Raoulia mammilaris

Aciphylla monroi, Kelleria diefenbachii and Celmisia viscosa

Raoulia mammilaris

Haastia sinclairi

Myosotis traversii.

Raoulia grandiflora

Hamish and Celmisia senucordata

Celmisia senucordata

Celmisia laricifolia  blooming


Gaultheria sp.

Dracophyllum


Dracophyllum in Racomitrium  moss carpet


Geranium sessiliflorum in two color phases

Raoulia mammilaris

Raoulia mammilaris

Back at the Brown home garden with Joe (far left) and Ann Cartman: Mika Brown half hidden behind Ann, and Jan Fahs to her left.
*Mount Southey: presumably named for Robert Southey, who coined the word "autobiography" and was first to tell the tale of Goldilocks and the three Bears. It is well worth reading the Wikipedia account of this once very influential Romantic Poet who has had a much greater impact on English Literature than is generally acknowledged nowadays.

Comments

  1. Superb once again … and so nice to see Ann and Joe looking so well.

    ReplyDelete
  2. … but I'm not convinced that they are Ranunculus insignis flowers.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Any idea what you think it could be Cliff?

    ReplyDelete
  4. I am fairly sure it is R. insignis but is probably a different form to what Cliff is use to looking at. R. insignis is highly variable and combines what were considered to be 3 separate species (insignis, lobulatus and monroi). The form in the photos is the monroi form which is shorter, has smaller, more ovate and less coarsely toothed leaves and unbranched scapes, compared with the insignis form.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Ah, my apologies, Hamish … I am obviously behind the times and was unaware that R. monroi had been unceremoniously consumed by R. insignis … not a bad fate, but we older readers need time to absorb such facts … another lifetime might just suffice. Best wishes to you both and I hope to meet up with Panayoti in Kent in April.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment