A summer's stroll: Denver Botanic Gardens July 24, 2013

Agave americana 'Variegata' underplanted with Sedum spurium on the East Terrace
This is the 34th summer I have had the privilege of working at Denver Botanic Gardens. Usually midsummer means doldrums: strangely, this time of year is still wonderful here. This is just a smattering of what you would see if you visited this week...there is a link at the very bottom where you can see even MORE things in motion...The dozens of still pictures were taken on about an hour's stroll--then I had to go back to my office. Or there would have been more!
 
Ptilotus exaltatus 'Joey'
 A wonderful Australian annual not often seen--on the West terrace Nexus berm.


Lilium 'Vern's Beauty' (I think)

Salvia patens


Salvia pachyphylla on Dryland Mesa


Salvia pachyphylla on Dryland Mesa

Salvia pachyphylla and Hesperaloe parviflora on Dryland Mesa


Yucca elata on Dryland Mesa


Sapindus drummondii and sculpture at West Pond


Zinnia grandiflora among cacti on Dryland Mesa

Escobaria vivipara v. radiosa


Agapanthus campanulatus 'Headbourne Hybrid'

Agapanthus campanulatus 'Headbourne Hybrid'


Kniphofia cv.


Dimophotheca cvs.

Containers in South African plaza

Crevice garden at entrance to Rock Alpine Garden--one year old!


Rock Alpine Garden lower meadow


Pycnanthemum tenuifolium


Pycnanthemum tenuifolium


Rock Alpine Garden lower meadow

Central crevice garden with Campanula fragilis ssp. cavalinii


Campanula 'Hilltop Snow'


Rock Alpine Garden lower meadow


Daphne oleioides


Daphne 'Lawrence Crocker'


Origanum 'Barbara Tinguey'


Opuntia engelmannii


Campanula fragilis ssp. cavalinii below Campanula raineri above

Seseli gummmiferum

Prunus prostrata


Prunus prostrata


Pelargonium endlicherianum


Pelargonium endlicherianum


Symphyandra wanneri and Clematis x texensis (probably crossed with C. pitcheri)


Clematis x texensis (probably crossed with C. pitcher)


Lilium davidii ex China


Lilium davidii


Bill Barnes holding up Agave neomexicana


Micromeria thymifolia

Verbascum bombyciferum growing in a crevice


Campanula incurva


Containers in South African plaza


Eupatorium purpureum

Beneficial inset hotels...in Birds and Bees garden

Phlox paniculata ('Peppermint Twist' in there somewhere...)

Morina longifolia


Morina longifolia


Albertia sp. ex Kazakhstan


Albertia sp. ex Kazakhstan


Salvia nubicola ex Pakistan

Salvia nubicola ex Pakistan


Ligularia dentata


Napaea dioica

Napaea dioica


Hemerocallis cv.


Lilium henryi


Lilium longifolium


Lilium longifolium


Hemerocallis cv.


Kniphofia 'Alcazar' (I believe...)


Salvia darcyi


Vitex agnus-castus


Opuntia lindheimeri 'Linguiforme'


Vaquelinia californica


Vaquelinia californica


Nolina microcarpa


Albizzia julbirissin


Nolina lindheimeri


Cylindropuntia whipplei


Entrance to Marnie's Pavilion
 
 

And if you have not had enough of the Botanic Gardens' madness, just click on this video!

 
And for you floral masochists, here's more!

Believe it or not--this is all just scratching the surface.

To quote the central stanza of my very favorite English poem (Andrew Marvel's "The Garden")


                  "....What wond'rous life in this I lead!

                  Ripe apples fall about my head

                  the luscious clusters of the vine

                  upon my mouth do crush their wine.

                  The nectarine and curious peach

                  into my hands themselves do reach.

                  Stumbling on melons as I pass,

                  ensnared with flow'rs I fall on grass..."

Comments

  1. Amazing images, plants and gardens ... or, as we are prone to say in England, b....y wonderful!!!

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  2. So much eye candy, and so many flovers! What a woderful place.

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  3. I sometimes weep when I enter the gardens; they are so overwhelming. You and the gardens are a treasure to us all. Thank you for what you are doing.

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  4. You are all too sweet! I do feel like a lucky devil...

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  5. Please keep posting regular views there. So nice to see that Denver horticulture is more than bluegrass, riparian lollipop trees, russian sage/karl foerster grass, and midwest worship - maybe more will actually prove that in their work! The crevice gardens there are really cool to look at.

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  6. Panayoti, I really wish you would include a second photo of the crevice garden where the plants have been labeled. I am not talented enough the identify all the plants from a photo.

    James

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  7. I enjoy the way that you and DBG are making our dry state so lush. In this post, I am particularly in love with the crevice gardens, which are so clever.

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  8. Great post!!! I had just visited the garden and did a post on it and a reader recommended I visit your blog and am glad I did! I look forward to your upcoming posts as well!!

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  9. I believe that the Eupatorium purpureum is actually Eupatorium(Eutrochium) maculatum. According to the Missouri Botanical Garden and Illinois Wildflowers E.purpureum has green stems and purple only at the base of the leaf petioles. E. maculatum can have solid purple or purple spotted stems. Not sure that this will be read since it was more than two years ago.

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  10. Thank you for the correction, Anonymous: I'll change it when I get a chance!

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